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Background= wooden frame covered with the cheapest white sheets you can find.

Overhead Projector Cart= turned into a studio quickly and easily by simply setting an iMac on it and mounting a lighting rig to it.

Clamp Lights= with a simple cover of wax paper (the kind you use in the kitchen) harsh light is made soft.

Super Cool Coats= a quick trip to the local thrift store and we have uniforms for our anchors.

Blue Snowball Microphone= A fantastic USB mic. Viewers will tolerate poor video quality (to an extent), but not poor audio quality.

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on Jun 7, 2010
by Jonathan Bartels
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In my personal opinion, there is nothing better than a Mac when it comes to working with video. But Apple products were hard to come by in our PC-dominated district. Once the principal was onboard with the idea of the project, he called in the district technology director to help work out some of the logistics. Being in a small county suddenly played to my advantage, and I was asked questions that I never expected to hear: "What do you need to do this? If you had your realistic dream setup, what would it be?" 

"Four Macs, Blue Snowball microphones, and a hard drive camcorder."

"Done." As a bonus, they even tossed in two copies of Final Cut Studio, a delightfully complicated software toolset. 

I also needed a converter to run the lines from the computer into standard AV lines so it could be plugged into our school's networked television system for broadcast.

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on Jun 7, 2010
by Jonathan Bartels
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Like so many projects I start with my students, this one began with my own desire to play with and explore digital video production. As a result, the Williamston Digital Broadcasting Project was launched. 

Announcements at Williamston High School

Old Way

New Way

Gathered and typed by vice principal

Gathered and typed by students

Read by SGA volunteer participants

Read by Mass Media class members

Shot and aired live

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on Jun 7, 2010
by Jonathan Bartels
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After my first year at Williamston High School, I was labeled as one of the writing teachers within the English department. I was given some degree of freedom with how I wanted to explore and develop new ways of teaching writing. There were two significant struggles I constantly faced with what seemed to be little reward: motivation and voice. All too often, my students shot strange looks my way as I grew increasingly excited about assignments and they grew more and more disengaged with what was going on in class.

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on Jun 7, 2010
by Jonathan Bartels
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A student, Harris, talks about her experience as part of the Williamston Digital Broadcasting Project. Harris explores topics of audience awareness, feedback, creating voice, and the recursive nature of the production process.

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on Jun 7, 2010
by Jonathan Bartels
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The Center for Media Literacy (CML) is an educational organization that provides leadership, public education, professional development and educational resources nationally.

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on Jun 4, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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A digital story by Adrian, Bhavesh and LaMar in response to the My Generation assignment.

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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A digital story created by Louis and Rodolfo in response to the Characterizing the Neighborhood assignment.

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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Inquiry is the component that underlies everything in this project: my initial question, supporting curriculum design, and reflection as well as my students’ inquiry process culminating in their reflective essays. As I discussed earlier, when I introduced the digital story project to my students, I told them about my Summer Institute experience and my inquiry and encouraged them to be part of the inquiry, too. Like me, reflecting on my practice, they would be reflecting on their experience. Their reflections while helping me with my inquiry could help them to become metacognitive writers and more proficient critical thinkers. We would all be researchers together—recording and analyzing our data. At first they weren’t sure what all this would mean, but delighted with the computers and making digital stories, they were willing to participate.  

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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I continued my inquiry the next school year. No more quandary. I now was convinced that the digital story project was not a frivolous waste of time. On the contrary, it was rigorous academic work with so many added benefits.

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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We begin with materials from Pearson Foundation's Digital Arts Alliance Project, the essay assignment, and a class schedule for preparing for the Pearson residency. Students form groups, choosing partners or trios to work with, workable numbers for sharing computers. Then collaboration begins as each group brainstorms, talks, compromises to decide on their topic. As usual, I break down the process into workable segments to help students at each step and to keep them on schedule. I use the same process I always do for this composition assignment, but work on modifying for the digital component.

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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During the 2008-2009 school year, my class was involved in a service learning project. The project utilized various technologies and digital media to complete the task. These tools proved to be invaluable for the English language learners who comprised the majority of my classroom.

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on Jun 2, 2010
by Robert Rivera-Amezola
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Project New Media Literacies (NML) is a research initiative that explores how we might best equip young people with the social skills and cultural competencies required to become full participants in an emergent media landscape and raise public understanding about what it means to be literate in a globally interconnected, multicultural world.

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on May 27, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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The Digital Youth Project brought together 28 researchers over the course of 22 research studies and three years, in an effort to better understand the ways in which youth integrate new media into contemporary youth culture.

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on May 27, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
Image originally uploaded on Fri, 2010-05-21 08:01
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The Stanford Study of Writing tracked the development of writing practices of Stanford students during their undergraduate and early post-graduate years in a longitudinal study that took place over the course of a five-year period.

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on May 21, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner

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