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What a great event to celebrate how digital tools have transformed education!

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on Feb 6, 2013
by Janelle Bence
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Originally posted as a guest blog for Education Week on January 30, 2013:

In my last post, I wrote about the potential value of education technology and how it can be used to give power and agency to students to tell their own stories. I got a glimpse of this transformation taking place in my class this quarter.

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on Feb 6, 2013
by Meenoo Rami
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Originally posted as guest blog for Education Week on January 23, 2013:

What role does technology play in your classroom? What questions do you ask yourself before you choose to use a particular web-based tool or application for instruction? What is your students' impression of your perspective on technology?

These questions are worth considering when we talk about encouraging teachers to incorporate technology in the classroom.

I often turn to my principal Chris Lehmann's words on technology to guide my use of it in the class. In his keynote addresses, he often says that technology should be like oxygen, "ubiquitous, necessary, and invisible." In other words, technology should get out of the way, while thoughtful pedagogical choices should guide classroom practice.

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on Feb 6, 2013
by Meenoo Rami
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As we enter February and as we come off the inauguration of the second term of the U.S.’s first African American president, it seems appropriate to talk about Black History Month and its place in school cultures.
 
Straight up, should we continue to celebrate Black History Month? Yes. Why? We struggle with the application of multicultural education during this one month; it essentially confirms that whiteness is the standard in U.S. education, right? Look at it this way though. Explicitly participating in Black History Month events enables educators to have all students confront our history of racialized violence in the United States and then affirm that race, although social constructed, is continually relevant to all lives.
 

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on Feb 6, 2013
by chelsea henderson
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“…[An African American is] born with a veil, and gifted with second-sight in this American world,—a world which yields him no true self-consciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world. It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. One ever feels his two-ness,-an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being town asunder” -W.E.B DuBois
 
This past Friday in my current teaching internship in a 10th grade special admission high school English class, the teacher, J, had the students read the above quote out loud. They were then given 10 minutes to think about what the quote meant in their small groups or individually. 
 

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on Feb 6, 2013
by chelsea henderson
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This is part of an ongoing series of discussions I am having with my good friend, Anna Smith, about digital literacies. (You can follow the entire thread of our back and forth talks here.) The other day, Anna asked the question of “where isn’t digital” as she considered a quote by David Wees about the importance of digital literacies in a technology/media-rich world.

Here is an infographic that she created to make her point:

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on Feb 6, 2013
by Kevin Hodgson
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“The teaching acts that constitute the core functions of urban teaching are:

  • giving information,
  • asking questions,
  • giving directions,
  • making assignments,
  • monitoring seatwork,
  • reviewing assignments,
  • giving tests,
  • reviewing tests,
  • assigning homework,
  • reviewing homework,
  • settling disputes,
  • punishing noncompliance,
  • marking papers, and
  • giving grades.”

“In most urban schools, not performing these acts for most of each day would be considered prima facie evidence of not teaching.”

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on Feb 5, 2013
by Christopher Rogers
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On board an airplane is a great place to get some writing done. It has been a crazy busy life since my Digital Learning Day adventure began in November. Yesterday was full of last minute plans, students posting last minute blogs, setting up and revising lesson plans for 4 days ( I have never left my students more than a day, so this will be interesting.) They are excited to see what happens and so am I. Here’s hoping my guest teacher knows something about tech, as all the lessons revolve around digital researching and citing sources. A huge shout out to www.commonsensemedia.org and their teacher plans, they are amazing!! I know my kids are doing something valuable with their time in my absence.

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on Feb 5, 2013
by Writing for Change
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Happy Digital Learning Day Eve! I hope you enjoy some reflections from my students on:

Digital Learning Is....

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on Feb 5, 2013
by Janelle Bence
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Welcome World! Kevin (@dogtrax on Twitter) and I are having a conversation through digital compositions. Follow our whole conversation on Jog the Web!

I've been thinking a lot about an ongoing conversation I have been having with Troy Hicks that is captured by the quote in the graphic below from David Wees:

At what point do we stop talking about 'digital literacy' and recognize that people who cannot apply their literacy in digital situations aren't really literate any more?

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on Feb 4, 2013
by anna smith
Image originally uploaded on 2013-03-03 18:26
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Last month I went to the Educon conference at the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia for the first time and was so excited to see all of the amazing work being done by educators to incorporate digital literacies into their practices and classrooms. I was particularly inspired by the hackjam run by Meenoo Rami and Chad Sansing (watch it live here or read about Chad's reflections on it here). Immediately I saw how this activity might be a generative one for my digital literacies class at the University of Pennsylvania to help us consider more carefully the ideas of participatory learning, composing as making, and hacker literacies.

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on Feb 4, 2013
by Amy Stornaiuolo
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Mozilla Webmaker is in the process of creating Teaching Kits for each of our software tools and for a variety of event types. The kits contain information on the Mozilla Webmaker initiative as a whole, specific information on the particular tool that the kit is for, and then modular content that allows a facilitator to pick and choose what they want to teach and how. Teaching Kits are designed for mentors who wish to run participatory, collaborative workshops or classes that teach a variety of web literacies.

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on Feb 4, 2013
by Laura Hilliger
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So today I spent a lot of time working on the lead in video for my presentation this Wednesday. I have between 17 to 20 minutes to present our work, and I wanted to find a way to include the history of the journey into our interactive learning lesson at the Newseum on Wednesday. Enjoy!

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on Feb 3, 2013
by Writing for Change
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Join Mitch Resnick of the MIT Media Lab, Philip Schmidt of P2PU, and Natalie Rusk of the LIfelong Kindgergarten group for a look at Learning Creative Learning. Designed as an open-course from MIT, but without the heavy LMS, Learning Creative Learning will operate openly on the web using a variety of general consumer tools: blogs, a Googe+ community, etc. It should be a wonderful course for learning more about creative learning technologies like Scratch and for seeing how learning experiences can be designed on the open web. (A good antidote to MOOC-corporate fever.)

See more in this video by Mitch Resnick, below, and visit the course blog for a full overview and check out their Google+ ccommunity. The course starts February 11. Sign ups are open now.

 

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on Feb 3, 2013
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl

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The National Writing Project's Digital Is website is mentioned in The Education Innovator of the Office of Innovation and Improvement at the US Department of Education, February 17, 2011.

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on Feb 17, 2011
by Christina Cantrill
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The Cooney Center Fellows
Program
encourages research, innovation, and dissemination to promote children's learning. Fellows participate in a wide range of projects and, in doing so, develop broad exposure to scholarship, policy, and practice in the field of digital media and learning. This professional development program offers opportunities to:

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on Feb 3, 2011
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
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NWP Digital Is has a feature that now allows you to share content via Twitter, Facebook, as well as other social networking sites. You'll notice a quick link at the bottom of all collections, resources and discussions.

Happy sharing!

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on Dec 7, 2010
by NWP Digital Is
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As many members of the Digital Is community prepare to go to the National Writing Project and National Council of Teachers of English conferences in Orlando, Florida next week, we thought we'd pass along an invitation to contribute to a session led by Bud, Troy and Sara. Here's how they frame the invitation on their blogs:

A conference session is a waypoint, a time and place to check in on where we’ve
been, but more important, where we’re going.  So before we get to that
waypoint, let’s take a moment to share our own reports from cyberspace as a way
of starting this conversation.  Here is an open Google doc where we’ve left space for you to jot some thoughts as we move into our time together.  If you can join us for the session at NCTE, great.  But if not, and you’d still like to report or check in, feel free
to do so.

...
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on Nov 10, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
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Digital Is contributors and curators Christina Cantrill, Dave Boardman, and Anne Herrington will introduce the DIgital Is website to site leaders at a focused session at the NWP Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL next week.  Stay tuned for reflections on how site leaders think about using the website in their ongoing work.  The website builders are eager for even more user feedback and visioning.

Meanwhile, whether you are at the session or not, let us know what you think!

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on Nov 8, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
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Site-builders Bill Fitzgerald, Christina Cantrill, and Elyse Eidman-Aadahl joined the Teachers Teaching Teachers webcast last night.  Contributors and curators Kevin Hodgson, Chris Sloan, Bud Hunt, and Paul Allison also joined hosts Susan Ettenheim and Paul Allison for a discussion of the Digital Is launch.  New visitors to the site, along with contributors like Gail Desler, provided builders with a great window into the site's launch and usability.  Big thanks to all who joined us and provided feedback.

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on Nov 4, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
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Welcome to the launch of the National Writing Project's new focused collection of resources on the teaching of writing in a digital age. Today we're going through the count down. By the time you read this, we will have lift-off.

The National Writing Project is the premiere teacher network in the United States focused on the teaching and learning of writing. You can still learn all about us at our central website at www.nwp.org.  But there's no mistaking the impact of both the development of new digital tools for composing and of the internet as a global communications and collaboration space. What it means to write, to research, to publish, and to work together has changed dramatically in the last few decades.  As educators, we know our teaching must change too.

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on Oct 31, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl

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Inquiry is the component that underlies everything in this project: my initial question, supporting curriculum design, and reflection as well as my students’ inquiry process culminating in their reflective essays. As I discussed earlier, when I introduced the digital story project to my students, I told them about my Summer Institute experience and my inquiry and encouraged them to be part of the inquiry, too. Like me, reflecting on my practice, they would be reflecting on their experience. Their reflections while helping me with my inquiry could help them to become metacognitive writers and more proficient critical thinkers. We would all be researchers together—recording and analyzing our data. At first they weren’t sure what all this would mean, but delighted with the computers and making digital stories, they were willing to participate.  

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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I continued my inquiry the next school year. No more quandary. I now was convinced that the digital story project was not a frivolous waste of time. On the contrary, it was rigorous academic work with so many added benefits.

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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We begin with materials from Pearson Foundation's Digital Arts Alliance Project, the essay assignment, and a class schedule for preparing for the Pearson residency. Students form groups, choosing partners or trios to work with, workable numbers for sharing computers. Then collaboration begins as each group brainstorms, talks, compromises to decide on their topic. As usual, I break down the process into workable segments to help students at each step and to keep them on schedule. I use the same process I always do for this composition assignment, but work on modifying for the digital component.

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on Jun 3, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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During the 2008-2009 school year, my class was involved in a service learning project. The project utilized various technologies and digital media to complete the task. These tools proved to be invaluable for the English language learners who comprised the majority of my classroom.

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on Jun 2, 2010
by Robert Rivera-Amezola
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Project New Media Literacies (NML) is a research initiative that explores how we might best equip young people with the social skills and cultural competencies required to become full participants in an emergent media landscape and raise public understanding about what it means to be literate in a globally interconnected, multicultural world.

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on May 27, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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The Digital Youth Project brought together 28 researchers over the course of 22 research studies and three years, in an effort to better understand the ways in which youth integrate new media into contemporary youth culture.

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on May 27, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
Image originally uploaded on Fri, 2010-05-21 08:01
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The Stanford Study of Writing tracked the development of writing practices of Stanford students during their undergraduate and early post-graduate years in a longitudinal study that took place over the course of a five-year period.

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on May 21, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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Creative Commons understands that your students are all authors and wants them to be credited and respected when they put their work on the Internet for others to view, remix, and appreciate. That is why, they have made it possible to choose your own license based on your needs and hopes for your work

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on May 21, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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K-12 classroom teachers, librarians, technology support specialists, etc., gather every year at the K-12 Online Conference to join each other as they present and participate in discussions and activities virtually and, in many cases, not in real time.

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on May 21, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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Profiles in Practice: Digital Storytelling with Teacher Consultants of the National Writing Project is a collection presented by the Pearson Foundation and the National Writing Project that presents the work of five teachers, who have all practiced doing digital storytelling in their classrooms in the hopes of delivering instruction of core skills like collaboration, creativity, presentation, problem-solving, and critical thinking.

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on May 21, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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Making Stop Motion Movies is a detailed, how-to guide created by middle school teacher and Western Massachusetts Writing Project Technology Liaison, Kevin Hodgson, that showcases the reading and writing elements of film literacy and utilizes a popular medium in a way that is entertaining and educational. This guide creates activities and resources and highlights student work that reinforces how to use this technology successfully and efficiently.

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on May 21, 2010
by Henry Cohn-Geltner
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It started with a quandary. As a veteran writing teacher, I was struggling, feeling caught in the middle between my responsibility to prepare my high school students for the traditional academic demands of college and the prevalence of compelling technology in their lives. Although, I recognized the need for computer literacy, I was not willing to trade rigorous academic work time for frivolous computer projects. So, my quandary led to my inquiry: Is it possible to teach academic writing as digital composition? What happens to writing instruction and student learning when we go digital?

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on May 5, 2010
by Leslie Moitoza
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This video documents my work supporting students to use digital voice recorders for "book talks" that allowed them to be active participants in their own processes of inquiry and learning. Sharing their "smart thinking" with each other, and hearing their own voices in the recordings made such a difference in the kind of inquiry and learning process we went through together.

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on Mar 8, 2010
by Renee Webster
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While the term "digital storytelling" has been used to describe a wide variety of new media practices, what best describes the Center's approach is its emphasis on first-person narrative, meaningful workshop processes, and participatory production methods.

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on Feb 25, 2010
by Kate Leuschke Blinn
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This is an excerpt from a Teachers Teaching Teachers episode. Two students from very different backgrounds eventually come to an understanding. It's included in this resource because this was the medium that the discussion took place, as a podcast. Listen to how the students learn to listen.

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on Feb 24, 2010
by Chris Sloan

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